The Strokes’ ‘Room on Fire’ Turns 10

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roomonfire1 The Strokes Room on Fire Turns 10

(Courtesy of RCA)

 

In Not Fade Away, we take a look at the legacy of some of the greatest albums of the past few decades – some iconic, some lesser known – as they celebrate significant anniversaries. Here, we focus on New York garage-rock icons the Strokes’ sophomore album, Room on Fire, and how its’ fiercest competition came from the band’s own catalog.

It was late October of 2003 when the Strokes released the band’s second album, Room on Fire. The album was recorded over the summer of that year, after two solid years on the road supporting their wildly received debut, Is This It.

With that 2001 debut, the Strokes had vaulted to the front of the indie rock nation, the band’s denim and leather swagger all but personifying New York City cool at the dawn of the new millennium. The quintet’s road-honed chops from the Is This It tour were not lost on the band’s producer, Gordon Raphael.

“What was really awesome about [the Room on Fire sessions] was when they came in that first day, this was a band that had been on tour for two years straight, playing concert after concert,” Raphael recalled during an interview from a Seattle studio during a break while recording the band Red Martian. “The level of ability, tightness and power that they gained from that tour was unbelievably noticeable when they came back. They were not this fun, basement-y band anymore. They sounded more like Led Zeppelin than the Velvet Underground. It was so huge sounding. They still had the attitude and having fun, but they sounded like incredibly powerful and accomplished musicians.”

Raphael had a bird’s eye view of the Strokes’ rapid rise to indie rock notoriety, having produced the band’s initial rush of releases, from their debut 3-song The Modern Age EP through the first two studio albums, Is This It and the follow-up, Room on Fire. His relationship with the band is enduring, as emerging outfits consistently enlist his services hoping for just a touch of what he brought to those hallowed recordings.

“The day I arrived in the studio, they played me Room on Fire in its entirety, like, ‘here’s what we’re gonna do,’ and just ran through every song live right there,” the producer recalled. “So it wasn’t like three months of wondering what the parts were going to be or developing ideas. The songs were done, the parts were done, and Julian [Casablancas, the band's singer] just wanted three months of making every tone and every performance perfect.”

The recording got off to something of a rough start, with Raphael coming in to reprise his role manning the boards only after the band found itself unhappy with early sessions with producer Nigel Godrich of Radiohead fame.

 

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